Janice Dickinson arrives at Montgomery County Court of Common Pleas to testify against Bill Cosby. (Pool Photo/Getty Images)
Janice Dickinson arrives at Montgomery County Court of Common Pleas to testify against Bill Cosby. (Pool Photo/Getty Images)

During an intense cross-examination with Janice Dickinson, she told Bill Cosby’s lead defense attorney Tom Mesereau that she partied with a number of celebrities at Studio 54 in New York.

Though Dickinson kept stating her book was ‘poetic license’ which is why she didn’t mention the alleged rape and claimed she ‘exaggerated her drug use’ for a pay check, she said certain parts were true, including one part where she saw De Nero at the club on occasions in the 80’s.

“Cocaine was everywhere in Studio 54,” Dickinson continued. “It was everywhere in New York City. It was in law offices, photo studios, the airport. It was the 70’s.” Dickinson testified that she used cocaine for three days before checking herself into rehab.

“You just told the jury you’re willing to lie to sell books, true?” Mesereau asked. “No, I wanted a paycheck.” Dickinson told him. “So you’re willing to lie to get a paycheck, true?” Mesereau followed up. “No, it was poetic license.” she said. Dickinson said the term ‘poetic license’ during her testimony over 40 times.

“Do you take a lot of poetic license in this book?” Mesereau asked. “Everything.” Dickinson said. “Everything?” Mesereau asked. “You write about your life,” Mesereau started as he was cut off by Dickinson: “My life is fantastic!”

“Is that all fake?” Mesereau asked. “Some of it [is] poetic license.” Dickinson said.

“Well how much of your book is fiction and how much is accurate do you think?” Mesereau asked. “It’s non-fiction. I mean I don’t understand.” Dickinson replied.

“Well, you talk about Studio 54, which you said is like a home. You say ‘guys making out with guys, people fucking in the bathrooms, girls bent over the bar snorting while some sleaze took them from behind. Sex sex sex.’ It goes on and on and on.” Mesereau continued. “Are you exaggerating or are you telling the truth?”

It was a wild place.” Dickinson said, with a little laughter. “How so?” Mesereau asked. “People were dancing. People were having sex. People were doing drugs. People were drinking tea. Everyone went there,” Dickinson continued. “It was a place you could go and see people like Gore Vidal and Robert De Nero. You could see the prime minister’s wife. People of all walks of life went to Studio 54.”